Bagworm Moth Bag

This sticks case is a bagworm moth bag, constructed by begworm larva from silk and bits of needles to live in. It is also used as a molt and pupal case. These type of cases are generally found in hilly areas, particularly in wild berries plants . The begworm larvae live in these bags over winter and only emerge to eat. In the coming spring the male emerges as moth having wings, while the wingless female moth remains inside the bag her entire life. After mating the female lays eggs in her bag and then falls to the earth and dies.

Bagworm Moth Bag
Bagworm Moth Bag
Bagworm Moth Bag

Bagworm Moth Larvae
Bagworm Larva
Bagworm Larva

12 comments:

rocksea said...

interesting catch! do you get to see the moth (?) or does it stay inside the bag throughout its life? is it a moth itself or kind of a worm?

MObugs said...

Those look so different from the bagworms here in Missouri. Great picture.

Anastasia said...

you have a good eye!

Osaid said...

Interested to rocksea's question
...?...

Anna said...

This is really interesting. Thanks for sharing. Anna :)

birdy said...

Thanks Rocksea for the comment. I operate the bags, but they were empty. Bagworms or Psychidae belong to order Lepidoptera that includes moths and butterflies. Bagworms are the caterpillar (larval) stage of a moth. When the larva pupate, only male develop into moth, while the female remains like a grub (without wings and legs) and dies after laying eggs.

~PakKaramu~ said...

Pak Karamu reading and visiting your blog

rocksea said...

birdy, that is interesting information indeed! so much more nature life to explore and wonder at!!

Diane said...

I have never seen anything like that. Thanks for sharing!

MedaM said...

This really is interesting!

Marvin said...

Protection and camouflage combined. A very interesting post.

Sue said...

Hi! I found your blog through a search of bagworms. I have something hanging from a thread that looks like a spider's. It's on a trellis where I have a passion vine, clematis, and a dead from the freeze morning glory. I haven't posted it yet, but may. It sure looks like your bagworm, but I thought they were just on trees.